WRITER    HISTORIAN    RUSSIANIST

Helen

Rappaport

FORTHCOMING

I am pleased to announce my 14th book. It is a tough call, but a book I feel compelled to write.

Time is of the essence, but I shall leave no stone unturned in my urgent quest to get to the truth.

 With this in mind, I would welcome any serious suggestions and offers of new information   


On the 17th of July 2018 Russia will mark a centenary that is likely to prove more significant – nationally, emotionally and spiritually – than the anniversary

of the revolution that precedes it in 2017.


It is an event already loaded with significance in the minds of the Russian people, for in commemorating the centenary of the murder in Ekaterinburg of their last Imperial Family, they will finally come together in an act of national penitence for a horrifying act of murder perpetrated by the Bolsheviks. An enduring sense of guilt that as a people the Russians allowed this to happen has never abated down through the ensuing century.




Nicholas and his children with their loyal cossacks at army HQ, October 1916 Ipatiev House, Ekaterinburg, where the family were held April to July 1918 The Nine Kings,1910. Monarchs who attended the 1910 funeral of Edward VII. Nicholas II was absent because of the huge security risk

In a country peculiarly enamoured of outlandish conspiracy theories about the possible escape and survival of all or some of the Romanov family from their captors, 17 July 2018 will mark the ultimate, official recognition that this fantasy is over: the Romanov family did indeed all die in Ekaterinburg that night.

What will also make this 100th anniversary particularly important and significant is the fact that after years of controversy and official obstructionism the Russian Orthodox Church is also preparing to finally recognize and sanction the skeletal remains found in the Koptyaki Forest, after insisting on yet more DNA tests being carried out on them. There is no doubt that in July 2018 the Orthodox Church will be at the centre of a major glorification of Russia’s last Imperial Family, when it is also highly likely that Nicholas, Alexandra, their heir Alexey and his four sisters Olga, Tatiana, Maria and Anastasia will all finally be laid to rest together.

An Icon of the Romanov family

The Imperial Family all died at Ekaterinburg.

No miraculous escapes. No more bogus claimants.

Forget Anastasia and Ingrid Bergman. Now we must address the remaining burning question. For it is one that has nagged at me for the last ten years during which I have been researching and writing about the Romanovs:

The Race to Save

the Romanovs

How the World Failed Russia's Last Imperial Family


The Race to Save the Romanovs will be published simultaneously in the UK by Hutchinson

and USA  by St Martin’s Press, in time for the centenary in July 2018

Why exactly did their European royal relatives and the Allied governments with whom the Russians were fighting a war all fail to get the Romanovs out to safety?